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15 Best Things to do in Halifax (Canada)

15 Best Things to do in Halifax (Canada)

Here’s a list of the 15 best things to do in Halifax (Canada), along with famous landmarks, museums, and other points of interest.

Halifax is one of the largest cities in Canada with a total population of 348,634 people living within its urban area.

Halifax Citadel National Historic Site

Situated in the heart of downtown Halifax, the Halifax Citadel allows you to immerse yourself in history in a fun and entertaining way.

Experience live re-enactments and hear the crack of rifles in the air, see members of the 78th Highlanders carry out drills and see the noon gun – this is no ordinary step back in time!

There’s a fort for kids to explore, tales to hear and even a ghost tour by candlelight. Visit the Citadel, and you’ll soon see why it’s one of Canada’s most visited national historic sites.

Halifax Citadel National Historic Site

Walk along the waterfront in downtown Halifax

The Halifax Waterfront is arguably the hub of Halifax, and it’s where you’ll find both visitors and locals alike enjoying the 4km of the boardwalk. In summer, it’s a bustling hotspot and the perfect place to grab an ice cream or take in the atmosphere.

There’s a plethora of shops to browse and numerous excellent restaurants, or you may just prefer to sit and watch the world go by as you sit by the boardwalk. There’s so much to see and do along the waterfront that you could easily spend all day exploring it!

Halifax Waterfront

Photo: Paul McKinnon / Shutterstock.com

Halifax Public Gardens

The beautiful Halifax Public Gardens are just waiting to be explored. Established in 1867, the Victorian-era gardens are a designated National Historic Site and are the perfect place to relax and unwind in a charming setting.

The gardens boast traditional iron railings, a quaint bandstand, sprawling green lawns and meandering paths. Take a stroll through the gardens to take in the distinctly British charm of this attraction, which doesn’t feel all that dissimilar to an English seaside town.

Halifax Public Gardens

Alexander Keith’s Brewery Tour

No trip to Halifax would be complete without a visit to Alexander Keith’s Brewery. Alexander Keith’s beer has been going in Nova Scotia since 1820 and credits its exceptional beer to the water that informs every aspect of Nova Scotia.

On a tour of the brewery, you’ll learn more about the beer brewing process, learn about the vast and varied history of the Alexander Keith brand, and experience Nova Scotia at its finest. There are good songs, good stories, and, of course, good beers to enjoy.

Alexander Keith’s Brewery Tour

Photo: c.I.I.o / Shutterstock.com

Eat at King of Donair

Greek restauranteur Peter Gamoulakos brought the flavors of his homeland to Halifax in the 1970s, and his famous Donair has been going ever since. This unique take on a traditional Gyro (coined the above-mentioned’ Donair’) is a favorite among locals and visitors alike.

The King of Donair opened in 1973, and over the past 40 years, students, residents, and travelers from across the globe have all visited to try their very first Donair. The recipe today is still the same as the original and just as tasty.

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Canada is one of the most diverse countries in the world, and it wouldn’t be the same without the hundreds of thousands of immigrants who make the country what it is today.

The Canadian Museum of Immigration is situated at Pier 21, the place where nearly 1 million immigrants arrived between 1928 and 1971.

Today, the museum depicts the ongoing stories of immigration, showcasing the past to the present day and how immigrants have shaped Canada into what it is today. You’ll come away with a deeper appreciation of how immigration works and the lives it transforms.

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Photo: Rob Crandall / Shutterstock.com

Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market

The Halifax Farmers’ Market is a massive part of the city’s history, having been founded in the year 1750. Though the market has had multiple homes throughout its life, it is the longest continually running market in North America.

The market proudly hosts over 250 vendors, each of which represents a little part of Halifax’s history. Make your way around the stalls, and you’ll find an array of locally-sourced produce, hand-crafted gifts, and tasty treats to take home with you.

Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market

Photo: Debbie Ann Powell / Shutterstock.com

Halifax Maritime Museum

Halifax Maritime Museum is the oldest and largest of its kind in Canada. The museum started as the brainchild of Royal Canadian Navy officers, who wanted a place where the relics of Canada’s naval past could be preserved and appreciated.

Inside, the museum boasts a collection of artifacts depicting Nova Scotia’s maritime history. Visitors can learn more about the age of steamships, World War II convoys, The Battle of the Atlantic, and how Nova Scotia played its part in the aftermath of the Titanic tragedy.

Halifax Maritime Museum

Photo: EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse

Nova Scotia may boast over 160 historic lighthouses, but none are as iconic as the Peggy’s Cover Lighthouse, one of the most photographed in all of Canada. The surrounding fishing village of Peggy’s Cove is also worth checking out and offers some of the best seafood in the country.

The lighthouse keeps watching over the surging waves and lobster boats out at sea. Spend your day exploring around the rocks (though make sure to only walk on dry, white rocks to stay safe), before waiting till sunset to see the sky turn hues of yellow, orange and pink.

Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse

Fisherman’s Cove

Head to Fisherman’s Cove, and you’ll discover a quaint 200-year-old fishing village restored to its original glory. You’ll get to understand the past of this pretty village while taking in the pleasantries of its present-day charm.

Fisherman’s Cove is the place to meet colorful characters, hire a boat for the day, go deep-sea fishing, or see the works of local artists. You can shop for prints to take home with you or stop for a bite to eat – there’s incredible seafood to enjoy here.

Fisherman’s Cove

Photo: Juli Scalzi / Shutterstock.com

McNabs Island

Just a short boat ride from Halifax lies McNabs Island, the largest island at the entrance of Halifax Harbour. The island is part of the McNabs and Lawlor Islands Provincial Park, an area of unspoiled natural beauty just a stone’s throw away from busy and bustling Halifax.

The island boasts an array of events throughout the year, but it’s also the perfect place to stop for a picnic, take in nature, or learn more about the history of the area. To make the most of your time, consider taking a private guided tour.

McNabs Island

Fairview Lawn Cemetery

For a sobering experience, head to the Fairview Lawn Cemetery. This cemetery is the final resting place for over one hundred victims of the Titanic, which sunk in 1912. For some of those who lost their lives aboard the vessel, Nova Scotia is where they perished.

The Titanic sunk around 700 nautical miles from Halifax, with those who died buried in local cemeteries. Visit the graveyard to pay your respects, learn the names and stories of those who died and get a poignant reminder of just how lucky we are.

Fairview Lawn Cemetery

Photo: ackats / Shutterstock.com

Point Pleasant Park

Situated on the southern end of the Halifax peninsula, the 75-hectare Point Pleasant Park is a lovely day out for the whole family. There are over 39 kilometers of accessible trails and wide paths to explore, plus you can see the ruins of early forts, coastal ecosystems, and more.

Head to the large map at Tower Road to find all the points of interest and walkways available to see. There’s a beach to check out too, and you’re welcome to swim there (though be aware that it is unsupervised).

Point Pleasant Park

FIN Outdoor Film Experience

Nothing says’ summer fun’ like an outdoor movie screening experience. For nearly 20 years, the FIN Outdoor Film Experience has delighted locals and visitors to Halifax with unforgettable outdoor film screenings suitable for people of all ages.

The gigantic inflatable screen makes weekend summer nights even better, as classic movies are shown under the open sky. Take a chair, grab a blanket, cozy up and enjoy the sense of community as you watch timeless movies in a fun-filled environment.

St Paul’s Anglican Church

St Paul’s is the oldest building in Halifax, and one of the oldest Anglican places of worship in all of Canada. Founded in 1749 by King George II, the church is reminiscent of London’s St. Peter’s Church, which was designed by the same architect.

Inside the church, see and learn about the” Ghost Window” and a piece of wood embedded in the wall, both of which are relics of the Halifax Explosion in 1917.

Worship here or simply admire the architecture and religious history. This church serves as the center of Christianity in Halifax. 

St Paul’s Anglican Church

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